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Loft Conversion: Roof Types and Their Implications

There are plenty of solutions to the problem of insufficient living space, but home extension is perhaps the best and most cost-effective way to address the problem. There are of course, many different methods to achieve this, but none is probably as popular as a loft conversion. There’s just a lot of reason why this home extension method is preferred by many homeowners.

Why Go For Loft Conversion?

Turning the attic into a decent, liveable loft room is what loft conversion does. This means to extend a house’s living space basically breathes life into the attic, that space between the roof and the ceiling that often falls to long periods of neglect and misuse.

In many occasions, loft conversion often comes at a great financial cost; sometimes, it may even be deemed as impractical. However, this home extension method is still very popular, and for many understandable reasons. For one, it does not consume a lot of space like first floor extension. As a result, no new construction is needed, thus saving a lot of money on building materials like wood and concrete. Also, a loft conversion is very flexible, and applicable anywhere with a sloped roof.

Types of Roofing Structure

We’ve previously mentioned that loft conversion is not always feasible. The possibility of conversion is decided by various factors, among which is the roof structure. There are three loft conversion roof types, each design dictating what type of loft can be possibly built into it:

1. Truss roof
The truss is a relatively modern type of roof support. Its use became common during the 1960s, and is now a common feature of houses built after the aforementioned decade. It is easily characterized by its W-shaped supports that connect the floor to the ceiling. This unfortunately cannot be converted into a loft, as the required modifications will significantly weaken it. As such, truss roofs are often replaced with better alternatives if conversion ought to push through.

2. Hipped roof
A roof is called hipped if it has sloped sides all throughout. It is also characterized by its rafter supports, and is often called the rafter-type roof. Such internal framework makes this very suitable for conversion as its obstructive beams can be cleared out without consequence. Given the present building regulations regarding head room however, converted hipped roofs do not cover much of the attic’s floor space.

3. Gable roof
The gable refers to one of those loft conversion roof types supported by two or more walls called gables. Converting this creates a loft that maximizes the ceiling space, unlike hipped roof conversions. The gable roof comes in three forms: the “gable” whose pitch or roof height is uniformed; the “gambrel” which has one section of the roof higher than the rest; and the “salt box” which is known for its randomly varying pitch.

Knowing which of these loft conversion roof types sits atop your house is important before planning any conversion project. It not only helps you determine the practicality of loft conversion, but also allows you to learn what sort of conversion is possible and what is not.