Right Lofts – Loft Conversion Experts

Find an expert loft conversion company with RightLofts.co.uk

Alternative House Extensions to Loft Conversion

If you are a frequent visitor to this site, then you’re probably more than aware of loft conversion. If not, then it is a way to extend your home by renovating your attic such that it becomes a far more useful part in the house than it originally is. This is a very convenient way to extend your home, despite the fact that it does not always come cheap.

However, loft conversion simply is not for everyone. There are many cases where a house is not compatible for such home extension process. However, the good news is that there are alternatives to loft conversion. We’ll explore the most common of these home extensions in this article.

Single Storey Extension

A single storey extension is perhaps the most common of all house extensions. It most likely is the first thing that will come to your mind whenever someone mentions “home extension”. In this extension method, a connected edifice is built at the side or rear of the house. Single storey extensions are commonly built with pitched roof, although flat-roofed extensions used to be common.

Multiple Storey Extension

Multiple storey extensions are basically similar to single storey extensions except that you are extending your house from two or more floors. When juxtaposed from the front or side of the house, they are often required to be of similar style and make as the original structure. That’s not all. In fact, this type of extension has more legal strings attached than the last.

When opting for a multiple storey extension, you also have to consider the established town plan and whether or not you will be affecting your neighbors in any way. As a heads up, do not build your extension where you will be denying the house next door access to sunlight or other such amenities.

Basement Conversion

The basement, like the attic, is another good place to renovate in order to expand your living space. However, it takes a lot less effort to convert than the loft, as just about every requirement of an extension is satisfied by the basement’s structure. This is assuming that your house already has an existing basement that’s been idly used for storage or not at all. If a basement is not present or is too low to be habitable, you can still dig one out in accordance to laws and regulations.

However, both cases have the problem of keeping groundwater from seeping into the basement. Techniques to achieve this mainly include adding a layer of waterproofing materials to the wall.

Conservatory

Conservatories or greenhouses – rooms with glass roof and walls used to grow plants – are popular in the 90s and way back to the Victorian era. The advantage of building a conservatory is that it does not require any involvement from the planning office, if the structure fits the legal definition of a conservatory.

The downside however, is that it cannot keep up with the times. Conservatories can no longer provide a comfortable temperature, and tends to produce unnecessary CO2 when we are all trying to lessen the existing amount.

Each of these house extensions is suitable for different situations. Never neglect different factors like your area, temperature and budget when deciding how to expand your home.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*