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Loft Conversion Costs: Factors and Prices to Consider

Living space in one’s home decreases as time goes by. The whole place ends up cramped as the property is accumulated or as new members get added to the household residents. This can be a problem to some, for which there are varying solutions. One of these is moving to a new house and another is to extend the first floor. Many however, choose to have their attics undergo loft conversion.

Converting the Loft

Converting the loft is a very practical and popular way of extending one’s living space. This requires relatively less time and effort when compared to first floor expansion and relocating to a new home. Here you don’t need to build anything from the ground up as you already have the roof and ceiling serving as your loft’s structure. It just needs some serious renovation, and you’ll be good as done.

Factors to Consider when Determining Conversion Costs

The cost is always the first thing to be figured out by anyone planning to have their attic converted into habitable lofts. The price of conversion projects usually start from around £12,000 to £60,000. Of course, the price for the rest of the project can vary. When calculating the actual cost, these are the factors you have to consider:

1. The final product.
The end result of the conversion project determines how much the loft conversion costs. The rule is that the more complex the loft is, the higher it will cost. For instance, complete residential rooms with bathrooms and all can start at £12,000, while a simple attic storage costs a measly £1000 all in all.

2. The loft’s size.
As with every conversion project, the size dictates how much is going to be spent on various essentials, specifically materials used to reinforce the structure and finish up the interiors. There is no price estimate for these, as it all depends on price of the materials, which in turn depends on the manufacturer and the area.

3. Loft access.
Stairs are a primary means of access to lofts. The cost, like that of the entire loft itself varies depending on the stairs’ complexity. Traditional ones cost around £500, while spiralling staircases come at more or less £2000.

4. Windows.
There are two common options for loft windows. The first is the dormer, the entire construction of which costs at around £2000. The second is the cheaper skylights which double as daytime illumination, the price of which comes at around £600.

5. Professional help.
Certain tasks like plumbing and installation of electricity are required by law to be done by their respective specialists. Meanwhile, the design process and overall construction may be beyond your means. As such, you should hire the necessary professionals and possibly, blue collar workers. Their costs vary, but we recommend employing the services of conversion firms rather than hiring individual contractors which are usually cheaper.

Loft conversion costs are never cheap. The expense however is only for the short term and the long term benefits of owning a loft totally outweighs everything you’ve spent constructing it.

Loft Conversions and Their Benefits

Many people who have lived in a single house for quite a while share a single problem. This is the ever shrinking living space that resulted from the gradual accumulation of material possessions and possibly an increase in the family’s size. Whether this is a bad thing or not is somewhat subjective however. There are just some individuals who like their cramped home the way it is, while there are many who feel like they can use a little more living space.
Like any other problem, this has several solutions. One option is to leave and move to a bigger house, but a change in address may lead to complications and new houses are expensive to begin with. Some try to alleviate the problem by enlarging their house, which, though cheaper than moving, takes a lot of time and effort to complete. The more practical ones however, resort to loft conversion.

Explaining Loft Conversion

Now what is loft conversion, you ask? Simply put, it is the conversion of the attic into a loft, thereby giving use to this often underutilized space between the ceiling and the roof. Loft conversions are popular in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, owing to the fact that this solution to the shrinking of household space is not as expensive as both moving and literal home expansion in terms of money, time, and effort.

Loft conversions in any form however aren’t merely done by setting up your attic such that it looks like a room. No, it’s not that simple. There are standards you are required by law to follow. Building authorities have issued building codes specifically concerning attic conversion, and these are enforced by the local building control officer, a professional in his own right and a person who can actually help during the conversion process. Don’t view the building rules as pointless restriction though; each paragraph aims to ensure that your loft is safe and stable.

The Benefits of Owning a Converted Loft

Experts will often recommend loft conversion not just because lofts are good to look at. A home owner can certainly enjoy several benefits associated with owning a loft. The first obviously is the additional living space gained from a loft. This amounts to what is basically somewhere around 30% of the house’s liveable space, which is a really big waste before the conversion.

Next, we have the fact that lofts increase the house’s value at more or less 20%, as it adds up to the usage of the house for every square meter its first floor occupies. Thus, those planning to eventually sell their home can benefit from owning a loft.

The last benefit is that you can make money from your loft, even before you could start thinking about selling the house. Get the right business papers, separate the loft from the rest of your home, and have it rented to individuals, small families, or short-term residents.

Loft conversion however, isn’t cheap. Fortunately, the price can be offset by the benefits a loft can possibly provide besides giving you that extra space you’ve always needed.

What to Do with all that Loft Space

Loft conversion is one great way to expand your home, especially if you are in need of extra living space or would simply want to increase your house’s value. This home extension method is basically renovating your unused loft space into a more functional room, if the right conditions as prescribed by law are met. It is by far more efficient than other ways to extend your house, as you are literally building into an existing framework, and on top of the existing structure.

Why Do a Loft Conversion?

One great reason why you should opt for loft conversion is its practicality. When converting that attic to extend your living space, you already have a structural framework – the ceiling and the roof – to build into. Also, your attic is the largest unused space in your house, so it should give you a fairly large living space post-renovation, even if you’ll only be allowed to build on a fraction of the entire loft space.

So what can you possibly make out of your loft? Here are a few examples.

  1. Convert Loft into a Bedroom
  2. Lofts commonly end up as bedrooms after conversion. Being such a huge space, attics will usually allow a set up of more than one bed. If the attic is spacious enough, you can even make multiple bedrooms instead of a simple dorm. In any case, you should always make sure the room has at least one toilet, electricity and running water.

  3. Remodel Your Attic Space for Recreation
  4. Transforming the attic into a recreational room is also not uncommon. In this case, the attic may be converted into a home theater, a room for table sports, a music room, or a hall with assorted forms of entertainment. However, these aren’t the only options. Whatever recreational function you give your attic will always depend on your own definition of entertainment or whatever indoor activities that you enjoy.

  5. Convert Your Attic into a Kitchen
  6. For cooking enthusiasts, their attics are great places to move that small kitchen downstairs. Lofts often end up as large spaces dedicated to culinary activities. The room provided by the attic is often large enough to facilitate a comfortable atmosphere that’s conducive to the flow of the chef’s creative juices.

    Loft kitchens are especially recommended to those who run a catering business. The loft space should be wide enough for multiple cooks to work in conjunction, as well as for storing of food in large quantities.

  7. Make an Office Out of Your Loft
  8. The loft, if spacious enough for work, can also be converted into an office space. This is recommended for home-based workers or people who simply can’t let any unfortunate circumstance like sickness or disease get in the way of work. Lofts should have more than enough space for paperwork, a computer and practically any other tools you’ll possibly need to perform your office tasks from home. Loft offices are also great places to prop up a small start up company.

The loft space can be transformed into just about anything that touches your preference, and the ones listed above are just a small sampling. Always remember that whatever purpose you give your converted loft should correspond with your needs, and not because you simply feel like it.